Replacing a search appliance with… a search appliance?

With the news on the Google Search Appliance leaving the stage of (Enterprise) search solutions – of which there is still no record on the official Google for Work Blog – there are a couple of companies that are willing to fill the “gap”.

I think that a lot of people out there think that the appliance model is why companies choose for Google. I think that’s not the case.

A lot of people like Google when they use it to search the Internet. That’s why I hear a lot of “I want my enterprise search to be like Google!“. That’s pretty fair from a consumer perspective – every employee and employer are also consumers, right? We enterprise search consultants – and the search vendors – need to live up to the expectations. And we try to do so. We know that enterprise search is a different beast than web search, but still, it’s good having a company that sets the bar.

There are a few companies that deliver appliance models for search, namely Mindbreeze and Maxxcat. They are hopping on the flow and they do deliver very good search functionality with the appliance model.

But… wait! Why did those customers of Google choose the Google Search Appliance? Did they want “Google in a Box”? I don’t think so. They wanted “Google-like search experience”. The fact that it came in a yellow box was just “the way it was”. Now I know that the “Business” really liked it. It was kind of nifty, right? The fact was that in many cases IT was reluctant.

IT-infrastructure has been “virtualized” for years now. That hardware based solution does not fit into that. IT wants less dedicated servers to provide the functionality. They want every single server to be virtualized so that uptime/fail-over and performance can be monitored and tuned with the solution that are “in place”.

Bottom line? There are not many companies that choose for an appliance because it is an appliance. They choose a solution and take it for granted that it’s an appliance. IT is very reluctant towards this.

I’ve been (yes the past tense) a Google Search Appliance consultant for years. I see those boxes do great things. But for anything that could not be configured in the (HTML) admin interface, one has to go back to Google Support (which is/was great by the way!). There’s no way for a search team to analyse bugs or change to configuration on a deeper layer than the admin console.

So… If you own a Google Search Appliance, you have enough time to evaluate your search needs. Do this consciously. It may well be that there is a better solution out there, even open source nowadays.

 

 

This entry was written by Edwin Stauthamer , posted on zondag maart 13 2016at 05:03 pm , filed under Opinie, Technologie, Vendors . Bookmark the permalink . Post a comment below or leave a trackback: Trackback URL.

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